Our Search for Heroes

I’ve always been a fan of Tiger Woods and most probably, so have you.

As a golfer, I’m in awe of his shot making prowess, determined focus and theatrical understanding that professional sports are all about entertainment. His success as an African American golfer has broken barriers for young boys and girls of color who previously saw this sport as inaccessible. He sacrificed much of his life in pursuit of his goals and his success shined such a bright light on him that there was probably a weigh station that was in his path to greatness. He found that in 2009.

Tiger lost his way that Thanksgiving weekend and, along with those salacious stories, we all lost a bit of our hero.

The stories this past week or so have all been about Tiger’s redemption; how he overcame physical, mental and emotional hardships to return to the top of the leaderboard and more. To my mind, perhaps even more importantly we all found an old friend who we could believe in again.

We need our heroes.

At a time when some families can’t even get together for holidays for fear of discussing different political points of view, it’s good for us to see how Tiger’s success helps bring us all together. Our heroes help us to see the good in what is out there, and the possibilities for even more. Renewing our belief in Tiger Woods helps each of us believe in ourselves a bit more, as well. Hero’s however just aren’t on the TV. They are all around us and can inspire us in our daily work.

Your Challenge This Week: Who have been the heroes in your life? They may not have been social change agents but maybe someone at work who inspired you or perhaps one of your parents who gave you sage advice that you still carry close to your heart. Don’t forget your own heroic actions that you’ve taken and that impact affected others.

© Richard Citrin, All rights reserved, 2019

    2 thoughts on “Our Search for Heroes

    1. Great article. I have so many heroes and sheroes in my life. Today I will honor my maternal grandfather, Rev. William H. Polk who died in 1972. Granddaddy stood a little over 5″2″, but he had severe curviture of the spine. That never stopped him; as a youth he was a typesetter for the Pittsburgh Courier. He graduated from Gannon Theological Seminary in 1917 and went on to be an itenerent Methodist Minister until he retired in the 60’s. Rev. Polk was a terrible driver; he had to sit on several pillows just to see over the steering wheel. Always stepping out of faith and prayer he traveled up and down the highway from Pennsylania to the Shannendoah Valley of VA until he and Grandmommy moved to Leesburg VA, where his daughter Leona married my father Louis Vondell Roberts and where I was born. As children my three sisters and I would ride with him to Philadelphia for our summer vacation. He would tell us, “Be my eyes children.” Of course we would often get lost, but he would just laugh and tell us “God is taking the wheel.” And we would always arrive safely. Years after my grandfather passed away I went to Jamaica. I attended a funeral of a Seventh Day Adventist minister, who was apparently also a very short man. During the reading of his obituary, the speaker referred to the reverend as being “tally walla.” This patios translated into meaning he may have been a very short man , but he stood head and shoulders above most men because he was a “giant among men, full of spirit and faith.” That was my grandfather!

      If you are interested here is a link to African American trailblazers in golf. https://www.pga.com/timeline-african-american-achievements-in-golf

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