A Monthly Publication from Citrin Consulting
June | 2011


IN THIS ISSUE

Courageous Leadership

TED Talks

The Health Care Corner

 
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Courageous Leadership

What’s Your Brand?

Everybody has a brand. You may not know it and you may not like it, but how you perceive yourself and how others see you comprise your personal brand. And in your leadership role, your brand influences how others see you and act towards you as well. Many people have heard the story of how Herb Kelleher, the founder of Southwest Airlines drew a map of Texas on a cocktail napkin to describe how to fly cheap and simple, point-to-point routes in Texas. Kelleher was driven by two guiding principles in his formation of Southwest Airlines—“Keep employees first and keep execution simple.” Kelleher’s values and therefore his brand became the way of the world for Southwest Airlines. And this month, on June 18th, the airline will celebrate their 40th anniversary.

As a leader, it may be time to revisit your brand and make sure it represents how you want to be known and that it’s consistent with the goals of your organization. While you want your branding to help you lead, you also want to make sure that your efforts support the organizational goals. Here are some ideas to help you build your leadership branding:

  1. Check out your branding with the Twitter approach. Ask 5 colleagues to describe you in 140 characters or less. If they can’t do it (or if you can’t do it) then your branding may need some clarification.
  2. Build your brand on some simple premises—one or two focused ideas derived from the values you believe in.
  3. Tie the branding to what you want to achieve over the next year or so. What expectations do you have for your team, customers, and colleagues over this period and how will your actions help insure they are achieved?
  4. You can use the “fill in the blank” approach to creating your branding statement. The Harvard Business Review recommends that you try out the following statement: “ I want to be known for being_________________ so that I can deliver _________________ to my customers, employees and organization.”
  5. Set up metrics to assess how much impact your branding message is achieving. Is your team working more effectively – getting projects done on time or perhaps bringing in more sales? Don’t forget personal stories of success and missteps. These are powerful ways of expressing your brand as well.
  6. Make sure that you live the values you are stating. If you say you are going to be open and responsive to other’s opinions, you better make sure you are a good listener and responding appropriately. Post your brand in a prominent place where you can remind yourself of how you want to be seen by others. This will help you remember who you want to be.

I watched the success of Southwest Airlines as they grew into a national carrier and always enjoyed their light-hearted, fun, but safe approach to flying. A favorite memory involved getting settled into my seat one day and hearing the flight attendant speaking on the PA system, reminding us about the safety measures. He said, “As Herb Kelleher told me one day, just in case I had not been in a car in the past 30 years, here is how you buckle up your seat belt.”

So get your branding message together and buckle up for success.

 

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TED Talks

Small changes frequently yield significant results. And sometimes we don’t even know that incremental improvements are available to us. Terry Moore, Director of the Radius Foundation found out at age 50, that he had been tying his shoelaces incorrectly. He immediately changed his ways, giving him more time in the day and increasing his good looks, (at least below his ankle). This video was the first of TED’s 3 minutes lectures. http://www.ted.com/talks/terry_moore_how_to_tie_your_shoes.html

 

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The Health Care Corner

Health Engagement and Social Media

I was channel surfing late one night last week and found Lady Gaga’s Madison Square Garden Concert on HBO. Her music is amazing, the concert was great, and I love how affirming Lady Gaga is to all of her fans. After the concert, I decided to do a little research and check out the number of Facebook Fans Lady Gaga has and how many Facebook Fans or followers some well known medical celebrities have. Here are the stats:

  • Lady Gaga—36,000,000 (that’s millions)
  • Mayo Clinic—49,000
  • WebMD—79,000
  • Dr. Oz—1,168,000 (at least he’s over a million)
  • UPMC—2,800 (our local health care provider).

It’s pretty clear that the number one social media tool in the world is not a healthcare destination for many people. Makes sense since most of Facebook is about connecting with friends about our daily lives. I did have a couple of friends who had colonoscopies and allergy problems this past week but I didn’t see anything about these issues posted on their FB page. While I wouldn’t really expect to see these kinds of things on Facebook, it does make me wonder whether social media will ever play a larger role in our healthcare world.

If you are tech savvy, you may connect with your primary care physician via his or her secure network to check out lab results or ask a question. You may even go to your health insurer’s website to verify that a claim has been paid. But for the most part, healthcare and our engagement with it is purely web 1.0 (like a brochure, information only). Think about how you use the web for other things you do---buying products, checking out product quality, catching up with your friends, playing games, and you can see how far behind the world of healthcare is in its use of current technology.

If you could use technology to improve how you interact with the healthcare system, what would you do? Send an email to [email protected] and let me know your thoughts. We can start a healthcare engagement blog right here and now and you can help healthcare catch up to the 21st century

 

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